Write Short Notes On Tashkent Agreement And Shimla Agreement

The Delhi Agreement on the Return of War and Civilian Internees is a tripartite agreement between these states, signed on 28 August 1973. The agreement was signed by Kamal Hossain, the Foreign Minister of the Government of Bangladesh, Sardar Swaran Singh, the Indian Minister of Foreign Affairs and Aziz Ahmed, Minister of State for Defence and Foreign Affairs of the Pakistani government. [9] [10] [11] In accordance with Tashkent`s statement, ministerial talks took place on 1 and 2 March 1966. Despite the fact that these talks were unproductive, diplomatic exchanges continued in the spring and summer. The results of these discussions were not obtained due to differences of opinion on the Kashmir issue. The news of Tashkent`s statement shocked the people of Pakistan, who expected India to make more concessions than they got. Things got even worse when Ayub Khan refused to speak and went to solitary confinement instead of announcing the reasons for signing the agreement. Protests and riots took place at various locations in Pakistan. [3] To dispel the anger and concerns of the people, Ayub Khan decided to take the matter before the people on 14 January 1966. This is the difference with Tashkent`s statement that eventually led to the impeachment of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto from the Ayub government, which later founded his own party, the Pakistan People`s Party. Although Ayub Khan was able to satisfy the concerns of the people, Tashkent`s declaration significantly tarnished his image and was one of the factors that led to his downfall. [8] The agreement was the result of the determination of the two countries to “end the conflict and confrontation that has so far affected their relations”. He designed the steps to be taken to further normalize mutual relations and also defined the principles that should govern their future relations.

[4] [3] This agreement, commonly known as the Simla Pact, was born in 1971 from the war between the two countries over developments in the eastern wing of Pakistan. The aim of the agreement was to define the principles that should govern their future relations. It also provided for measures to be taken to further normalize bilateral relations. Most importantly, it forced the two countries to “resolve their differences through bilateral negotiations by peaceful means.” (iii) Withdrawals will begin on the effective date of this agreement and will be concluded within 30 days. [4] This agreement is ratified by both countries in accordance with their respective constitutional procedures and enters into force from the date of exchange of the ratification instruments. [4] On Monday, the National Assembly of Pakistan will have the opportunity to used a new era of peace and development in the South Asian subcontinent when it meets to ratify the agreement signed in Simla by President Bhutto and Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. The conclusion of the Pact, after five days of tense negotiations, reflected the determination of two pragmatic political leaders to end 25 years of conflict “so that both countries can now devote their resources and energies to the urgent task of promoting the well-being of their people.” The agreement was criticized in India because it contained no war pact or renouncement of guerrilla warfare in Kashmir.

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Jenny Smith